Antitrust consent decrees and the television broadcasting industry.

Hearings before the Antitrust Subcommittee (Subcommittee No. 5) of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, Eighty-seventh Congress, first session. June 14 and 15, 1961
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U.S. Govt. Print. Off. , Washington
Television -- Law and legislation -- United States, Antitrust law -- United States, Consent decrees -- United S
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 362 p.
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Open LibraryOL15254904M
LC Control Number61061971

Antitrust Consent Decrees and the Television Broadcasting Industry: hearings before the United States House Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Eighty-Seventh Congress, first session, on J 15, Get this from a library.

Antitrust consent decrees and the television broadcasting industry: hearings before the Antitrust Subcommittee (Subcommittee No. 5) of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, Eighty-seventh Congress, first session. June 14 [United States.

Congress. House. Committee on the Judiciary. For over one hundred years, the antitrust consent decree has been a major weapon in the federal enforcement of antitrust laws.

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In Antitrust Consent Decrees in Theory and Practice, Richard A. Epstein undertakes the first systematic study of their use and effectiveness from both a historical and analytical perspective.

Epstein observes how differences in antitrust philosophy can shape the kinds 4/5(1). HESTER: To the Department of Justice, it's just a consent decree that's been on the book for 70 years. And they say, ah, we don't need that. Throw it. The previous examples notwithstanding, the books are rife with consent decrees that antitrust enforcement agencies have used to extract overly restrictive or.

“Consistent with modern antitrust law, the Division will review the vertical practices initially prohibited by the Paramount decrees using the rule of reason,” Delrahim said at the : Dana Harris-Bridson.

Assistant Attorney General, Antitrust Division United States Department of Justice Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC RE: Antitrust Consent Decree Review - ASCAP and BMI Dear Assistant Attorney General Delrahim: The National Restaurant Association (Association) and the Restaurant Law Center (Law Center)File Size: KB.

Proposed Settlement Preserves Competition in Broadcast Television Advertising Markets Across the United States The Department of Justice announced today that it has reached a settlement with Nexstar Media Group Inc., one of the largest owners of television stations in the country, as part of its ongoing investigation into exchanges of competitively sensitive information in the broadcast television industry.

United States' Second Additional Explanation of Consent Decree Procedures (Aug ) Stipulation and Order [CBS] (Aug ) [Proposed] Final Judgment [CBS] (Aug ) Stipulation and Order [Cox] (Aug ) [Proposed] Final Judgment [Cox] (Aug ) Stipulation and Order [Scripps] (Aug ).

Consent Decree § II(C). The decrees also provide for the creation of two separate “rate courts,” to which either music users or the PROs may resort if the two sides are unable to reach a mutually agreeable price for a license.

See ASCAP Consent Decree § IX; BMI Consent Decree § XIV. In the last few weeks, the press has been buzzing with speculation that the Department of Justice is moving toward suggesting changes in the antitrust consent decrees that govern the operations of ASCAP and BMI.

Those consent decrees, which have been in place since the s, among other things require that these Performing Rights Organizations treat all songwriters alike in. Paramount Pictures, Inc., U.S.

() (also known as the Hollywood Antitrust Case ofthe Paramount Case, the Paramount Decision or the Paramount Decree), was a landmark United States Supreme Court antitrust case that decided the fate of film studios owning their own theatres and holding exclusivity rights on which theatres would show their ons: U.S.

(more)68 S. ; 92 L. A group of five television station owners agreed to settle Justice Department charges that they used third-party firms to illegally coordinate on sales of local advertising spots.

As part of The Department of Justice’s review of nearly 1, legacy antitrust judgments, the Antitrust Division today announced that it has opened a review of the Paramount Consent Decrees, which for over seventy years have regulated how certain movie studios distribute films to movie theatres.

The purpose of the review is to determine whether or not the decrees should be terminated or. On Novem Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim announced that the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice would ask a federal court to terminate the “Paramount Consent Decrees” (the “Decrees”), which have prohibited movie studios from engaging in certain distribution practices with movie theaters since the s.

and BMI, is not subject to an antitrust consent decree. In fact, due to the licensing posture and. practices of SESAC, the RMLC felt compelled to bring an antitrust lawsuit in the Eastern.

District of Pennsylvania seeking relief from what the lawsuit contends to be anticompetitive. U.S.

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DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, ANTITRUST DIVISION Washington, D.C. In re Antitrust Consent Decree Review: American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers/Broadcast Music, Inc.

COMMENTS OF NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS Introduction and Summary The National Association of Broadcasters (“NAB”) hereby submits its comments in connectionFile Size: KB.

It won't be the first time Justice has looked at the PRO decrees still on the books. Delrahim is clearly looking to prune back the consent decrees in antitrust cases, some of them almost a hundred years old.

The television industry's top news stories, analysis and blogs of the day. The music industry asked the DOJ to amend or clarify the consent decrees to state that fractional licensing was permitted under the consent decrees. The DOJ conducted an exhaustive investigation, and after looking at the language, history, Supreme Court precedent, and public comments the DOJ decided that fractional licensing was not permitted.

The Television Music License Committee, LLC (“TVMLC”) respectfully submits these comments in response to the United States Department of Justice Antitrust Division (“DOJ” or the “Antitrust Division”) request for public input on, among other things, whether the Consent Decree entered into between DOJ and the American Society ofFile Size: KB.

Microsoft Signs Consent Decree with U.S. Government to Settle Antitrust Case. November 2, | Share on Facebook (opens new window) for the entire technology industry, and for the economy. broadcast, radio and stills media only: Media Relations, Global Communications & Television, () The DOJ should be looking not at abolishing the consent decrees, but instead.

The Companies note that, SESAC, for instance, entered into private consent decrees with both the radio and television industry music licensing committees following litigation asserting that their operations raised the same risks as would an unregulated ASCAP and BMI.

Today's Biggest Antitrust Targets: Facebook, Google and Music Licensing (Yes, Really) While BMI and ASCAP are hamstrung by the consent decrees, a new player in the music licensing space is not.

Last week, after passage by both chambers of Congress and signature by the President, the ‘‘Orrin G. Hatch–Bob Goodlatte Music Modernization Act’’ became law.

The law underwent a few changes on its journey to approval, adding new provisions in the Senate to those which we summarized here upon its initial passage by the House.

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The Act retained its same principal purposes. Review of Consent Decree in United States v. Broadcast Music, Inc. August 6, Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) submits these public comments in response to the solicitation of public comments by the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (Department) as part of its current review of the consent decrees in United States v.

Broadcast. The National Association of Broadcasters, iHeartMedia, Inc., the National Cable & inquiry undertaken as a part of the DOJ’s ongoing review of the antitrust consent decrees in United States v.

ASCAP, 41 Civ. (S.D.N.Y.), and United States v. BMI, 64 Civ. spanning the broadcast radio and television, cable television, satellite. In a very important proceeding we summarized here, the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division is reviewing the antitrust consent decrees that govern ASCAP and BMI – the decrees that require that these performing rights organizations treat similarly situated licensees (and artists) in the same way and which allow a Court to review the reasonableness of the rates that ASCAP and BMI.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is grateful for the invitation from the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice (DOJ) to comment on the review of antitrust consent decrees entered against two performance rights organizations (PROs): the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) and Broadcast Music, Inc.

(BMI). A consent decree is an agreement or settlement that resolves a dispute between two parties without admission of guilt (in a criminal case) or liability (in a civil case), and most often refers to such a type of settlement in the United States.

The plaintiff and the defendant ask the court to enter into their agreement, and the court maintains supervision over the implementation of the decree.

Sinclair Settles DOJ Antitrust Investigation The station group said the consent decree resolves DOJ concerns about the sharing of advertising pacing with other station groups.

The settlement does not include an admission of guilt or involve any monetary damages for fines, Sinclair said. The Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice this month announced that it has opened a review of the year-old ASCAP and BMI Consent Decrees.

In its press release, the DOJ noted that it is most interested in comments “on competitive concerns that arise from the joint licensing of music by performance rights organizations and the.

The Department of Justice Antitrust Division earlier this week rejected efforts by performing rights organizations American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) and Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) and the two largest music publishers to relax the terms of antitrust consent decrees that govern the collective licensing of musical works for public performance.Ken was deeply involved in the seminal antitrust cases brought by the local television industry in the early s (Buffalo Broadcasting Co., et al.

v. ASCAP, et al.) and the cable TV industry in the early s (NCTA, et al. v. BMI, et al.), against both ASCAP and BMI, which set the framework for the consent decree litigations that have followed.